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Paper Towns by John Green - review

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❶They bond on the way, as Benjamin and Lacey are going to the prom together; Marcus and Angela consummate their relationship. I just wanted the book to end because I was extremely bored and unsatisfied.

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This was a very clever move that I haven't seen in a YA novel before. In my opinion, the best thing about this book was the discussion of identity. The book focuses on each character's different idea of Margo, and eventually their realisations that she is just a person like them.

There is so much I could say about the importance of the ideals in this book. The metaphors are beautiful, and really interesting. There are some gorgeous phrases that I would love to steal for my own writing. To give you a taster, my favourite quote is this John Green has done a remarkable job at balancing the metaphors and philosophical discussions with developed characters and some really funny comedy.

Q is relatable as our main character, a teenager who is at a bit of a lost point in his life. He does what most people would do in his situation, and is interesting without being precocious or cringe-worthy. His speeches are really well-written, and reveal a lot about his personality. Q's best friend Ben was a character I disliked throughout the most part of the book, with his derogatory language and backstabbing personality.

However, I think he added drama to the plot, and most readers can relate to having a friend like him. I really liked the character of Radar, Q's other best friend who is more intellectual and into posting on a site meant to be a parody of Wikipedia. In the second half of the book, we get to know Lacey, a former popular person and enemy of the three boys who befriends them and helps in the quest to find Margo.

She was a character who I grew to like gradually, but by the end of the book I could see how necessary she was to solving the mystery. Throughout most of the book, Margo is more of an idea than a character. Everybody has different memories of her, and so sees her differently.

Q's idea of Margo evolves through the story, and her character becomes steadily more complex. Even when we discover the real Margo, she is still one of the most complicated characters in YA.

Paper Towns was one of the funniest books I have come across in ages. There is ongoing snarky wit in the first two parts, mainly coming through Q's reactions to the strange things Margo seems to have done. A lot of comic relief also comes through Ben, particularly when he is drunk. Despite this, in my opinion, the funniest part of the book was the road trip towards the end. I won't spoil it, but it is crazily random and had me actually laughing out loud.

Not only this, but the book almost has its own language of inside jokes: Black Santas, catfish and beer swords are all involved. If I had to find a criticism for this book a hard feat , I would say the plot starts to drag slightly in the middle. There is a period where the clues all slow down a bit, and the humour is lost. That said, it picks up again with a major discovery.

Together with Quentin, they're a pretty sweet group of teens, and readers will enjoy their journey -- and conversations. Families can talk about edgy coming-of-age stories. Does the language or other mature content in this book seem realistic? Is there anything that is -- or should be -- off limits when it comes to books marketed to teens?

John Green's characters often go on road trips. What other road trip books or movies can you think of? Why are road trips so often a part of coming-of-age stories? Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate. Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase.

Thank you for your support. Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential. Learn how we rate. For Your Family Log in Sign me up. Reviews Find the good stuff, faster — from books to YouTube. YouTube channel reviews are here! The best media for your family, hand-picked by our editors. What's on your mind? Get answers to top parenting questions here.

Edgy, compelling teen angst mystery. John Green Friendship Sign in or join to save for later. Popular with kids Parents recommend. Based on 22 reviews. Based on 80 reviews. Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization. Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free. Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options A lot or a little? The parents' guide to what's in this book. Frequent use of "s--t" and "f--k," "faggot," as well as plenty of minor swearing.

Teens smoke, drink, and get very drunk. What parents need to know Parents need to know that as with Green's other books, this one contains some edgy material: Continue reading Show less. Stay up to date on new reviews. Get full reviews, ratings, and advice delivered weekly to your inbox. User Reviews Parents say Kids say. Adult Written by Stepha July 5, Wash out your Mouth with Soap! Bad language all over the place. Parent of a 11 and 13 year old Written by starbox October 29, A really great teen novel.

In terms of the content, I did not find there to be anywhere near as much language, sexuality, drinking, etc. That said, the mo Teen, 17 years old Written by rom

Paper Towns Summary & Study Guide Description

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Paper Towns by John Green tells the story of Quentin, otherwise known as Q. Q and his next door neighbor Margo used to be best friends and, as they’ve grown up and become high school seniors, they have turned into acquaintances/5(K).

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Paper Towns has , ratings and 45, reviews. Jamie said: I need to start off with my criticism of John Green:1) Margo and Quentin are exactly the /5.

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Paper Towns is truly an unforgettable book that is easily the best of the best. With no doubt I am sure it is the best book of and one /5(). Paper Towns debuted at #5 on the New York Times bestseller list and won the Edgar Award for Best Young Adult Mystery. It is taught in many high school and college curricular, often in conjunction with Whitman’s Leaves .

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Sep 17,  · Edgy, compelling teen angst mystery. Read Common Sense Media's Paper Towns review, age rating, and parents guide.4/4. Paper Towns is a fantastic, interesting and unique novel that I thoroughly enjoyed. I was very eager to read this following how much I loved An Abundance of Katherines, and I decided that I had to.