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Old Custom House, Montreal

The Custom-House: Introductory

❶My imagination was a tarnished mirror.

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

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We went in on a whim. It's a free attraction, but there wasn't a very lot to see. If you're into architecture, it's a great building, and there were some records on display from the Easter Uprising, but other than that it wasn't that interesting You are visiting www.

Flights Vacation Rentals Restaurants Things to do. All of your saved places can be found here in My Trips. Log in to get trip updates and message other travellers. The Custom House, Dublin: Dublin Northside Walking Tour. The Custom House, which has been a Dublin landmark for over two hundred years, was the architectural masterpiece of James Gandon.

It was completed in after a ten-year construction period. This exhibition outlines the history of the Custom Closed Now Hours Today: Do you have to pay for wi-fi at this place or activity?

Is this a must-do if you are travelling with a big group greater than 5? Is this place or activity suitable for all ages? Is this place or activity closed during certain parts of the year? Can this place or activity comfortably accomodate people using a wheelchair? Does this attraction provide visitors with a taste of the local culture?

Is this a place or activity you would go to on a rainy day? Would you associate this place or activity with history? Is it free to enter this place? Do you need to present an Identification Card when visiting this attraction? Share another experience before you go. Ways to Experience The Custom House. Show reviews that mention. All reviews beautiful building open to the public architectural masterpiece easter uprising culture night quick visit worth a visit north side great history liffey government james dome customs exhibition restoration facade.

Reviewed 3 weeks ago Historical Site. Reviewed 4 weeks ago A quick visit to explore a classical building of great historical significance. Reviewed August 2, Forgettable exhibition. Reviewed May 20, Beautiful Architecture. The narrator has already mentioned his unease about attempting to make a career out of writing. It will not be factually precise, but he believes that it will be faithful to the spirit and general outline of the original.

While working at the customhouse, surrounded by uninspiring men, the narrator finds himself unable to write. This section introduces us to the narrator and establishes his desire to contribute to American culture. Although this narrator seems to have much in common with Nathaniel Hawthorne himself—Hawthorne also worked as a customs officer, lost his job due to political changes, and had Puritan ancestors whose legacy he considered both a blessing and a curse—it is important not to conflate the two storytellers.

The narrator is not just a stand-in for Hawthorne; he is carefully constructed to enhance the book aesthetically and philosophically. Moreover, Hawthorne sets him up to parallel Hester Prynne in significant ways.

Like Hester, the narrator spends his days surrounded by people from whom he feels alienated. In his case, it is his relative youth and vitality that separates him from the career customs officers.

The narrator points out the connection between Hester and himself when he notes that he will someday be reduced to a name on a custom stamp, much as she has been reduced to a pile of old papers and a scrap of cloth.

First, he feels that his Puritan ancestors would find it frivolous, and indeed he is not able to write until he has been relieved of any real career responsibilities. Second, he knows that his audience will be small, mostly because he is relating events that happened some two hundred years ago. His time spent in the company of the other customhouse men has taught the narrator that it will be difficult to write in such a way as to make his story accessible to all types of people—particularly to those no longer young at heart.

The narrator finds writing therapeutic. Take the The Custom-House: The Scarlet Letter by: Introductory to The Scarlet Letter Chapter 1: The Prison Door Chapter 2: The Marketplace Chapter 3: The Recognition Chapter 4: The Interview Chapter 5: Hester at Her Needle Chapter 6: The Elf-Child and the Minister Chapter 9: The Leech Chapter

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

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A summary of The Custom-House: Introductory in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Scarlet Letter and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

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The Custom House (Irish: Teach an Chustaim) is a neoclassical 18th century building in Dublin, Ireland which houses the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. It is located on the north bank of the River Liffey, on Custom House Quay between Butt Bridge and Talbot Memorial laheimdo.cfon: Dublin.

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The Custom House at Salem Maritime NHS is the last of 13 Custom Houses in the city. There has been a Custom House in Salem since , collecting taxes on imported cargos first for the British Government during the Colonial period, then for the American Government after the establishment of the U. S. The Custom-House The Custom House is largely an autobiographical sketch describing Hawthorne's life as an administrator of the Salem Custom House. It was written to enlarge the tale of The Scarlet Letter, since Hawthorne .

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In "The Custom-House," we find out that our narrator is the chief executive officer of the Salem Custom-House sometime during the mids). His account is a mixture of fact and fiction and loosely follows the story of how Hawthorne himself came to write The Scarlet Letter. A Custom House is a governmental building situated near a port or a . Prying further into the manuscript, I found the record of other doings and sufferings of this singular woman, for most of which the reader is referred to the story entitled “THE SCARLET LETTER”; and it should be borne carefully in mind that the main facts of that story are authorized and authenticated by the document of Mr. Surveyor Pue.