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❶Be sure, however, to check with your instructor to ensure that these are considered acceptable sources for your assignment. Thus it is crucial to have a human scan your words.

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Global Support Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Who I am, and why I want to help you succeed. Key Aspects of the Test. Preparation You should familiarize yourself with the test and question formats, and get used to timing your responses. Results You will know the result of your application to the programme within weeks of completion of your application and test.

Time You should set aside 5 hours for the visit and the test. Singapore There are no upcoming events. Europe There are no upcoming events. Middle-East There are no upcoming events. The test has 5 sections. The test is followed by the interview. Data Analysis Fluency and efficiency in the use of business-relevant mathematics. Data Interpretation Data Significance testing through both standard mathematical logic questions, and also multiple linked mini case questions where arithmetic and algebra are tested in the context of a business scenario.

Communication Analysis Analysis of passages through the lens of gauging the main themes, relevant points and logical inferences. Critical Thinking Managing the components of a logic problem to either deliver a definitive answer to a question or simply determine its solvability. Business Case You are given 30 minutes to read a brief business case with key questions to consider and answer as part of the presentation given to the test panel.

Some topics, like U. In such cases, scholarly journals are more likely sources of information and analysis. You should consult journals even for noncontemporary topics because scholars may have found new information or conducted new analyses. You should be able to find most, if not all of these, in your library's reference room. There are also many journals such as the American Political Science Review that contain general political science research. You may also find valuable information that has been published in a report of a governmental agency, in hearings or reports of a congressional committee, or in the transcripts of the proceedings of Congress.

The United Nations and a number of other international organizations also publish proceedings and reports. There are several indexes available. Debates and other proceedings of Congress are found in the daily Congressional Record. At some schools, accessing government documents can be a challenge.

See your reference librarians for help with government publications. If you are covering a current topic or need to have a day-by-day account of events and cannot find one elsewhere, you may be forced to turn to newsmagazines and newspapers.

Be sure, however, to check with your instructor to ensure that these are considered acceptable sources for your assignment. Mostly they are useful for facts or for contemporary quotes and are usually not good sources of analysis.

Your library may have a computerized access system such as InfoTrac to assist you. The Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature also helps access this material. Some are now available on CD-ROM, allowing you to use the computer to search by subject and then print out the relevant stories. See the reference librarians for help with such resources. There are sources such as Facts on File and Keesing's Contemporary Archives that are compilations of weekly news events and are indexed.

Over the past few years it has become increasingly easy to find research information by using the Internet. Until recently the Gopher system of data archives was the dominant form of Internet information access, but now most governmental and nongovernmental organizations, universities, and even many businesses have developed access to their research resources over the graphic environment on the World Wide Web.

The following are a number of Web sites that will get you started in searching for information you may need in writing your research paper. Although some of the Uniform Resource Locators URL listed below are for specific information sources, most provide you with "hot-linked" lists that will get you to where you might want to look for information.

It is important to note that URLs change frequently. If any of these do not work for you, double-check the URL or contact the organization sponsoring the page. Our listing here can only begin to cover what is in your library. There may be a map room. There may also be an audio-visual section.

Some libraries contain archives or a rare book collection. Talk to a librarian or your professor for added information. Also realize that no library has everything. Consequently, you may find references to sources that are not found in your library. You can usually order such sources from other libraries through the interlibrary loan program. Check with your reference librarians to learn how to use this service.

Be advised, however, that interlibrary loans take some time. So order any needed sources as early as possible. Knowledge is not confined to libraries or even campuses. A surprising number of students know someone who knows something about the specifics of some U. Even if you do not know someone personally, you might find it interesting and possible to conduct an interview with a decision maker or some other relevant person. Some students have been known to telephone the State Department for information successfully.

Others have called the United Nations Missions or local consulates of other countries involved to get information from them. For advice on unconventional sources, see your instructor. The keys to effective papers are good organization and presentation of ideas and error-free technical skills. There are a number of sources that you can access to help you both organize and write your paper.

Our comments on writing a paper that follow may prove helpful to you, but they are not substitutes for the fuller discussions you will find in these writing guides. There are three organizational issues to consider. They are the outline, the parts of the paper, and the approach. No one would think of building a house, computer, or other important and complex project without a plan. Students regularly write papers without a plan. As a result, poor organization is a common weakness of undergraduate term papers.

The best way to construct your plan and to organize information for maximum effect is to put together an outline. An outline serves to lay out your paper's structure, to ensure that it is complete and logical, and to prevent you from getting off the track.

Determine what you wish to accomplish in the paper; then prepare an outline specifying every step from Introduction to Conclusion.

Linear writing is crucial in professional papers and reports. A good outline also serves to help you later: It ensures that you stay on track, write an accurate summary for your conclusions, and cover all of the relevant information and arguments. All papers should have three basic parts: The introduction is the key to letting your reader know where you are headed and what you will accomplish. Remember always that while the organization of your paper may be clear to you, it is not clear to your reader.

Therefore, the introduction is something like a road map that acquaints the reader with the journey ahead. This will make it easier for the reader to understand what follows and will improve the reader's evaluation of your work. Tell the reader in concise terms 1 what the subject of the paper is, 2 what it is that you hope to find out, and 3 how you will go about it. If you are writing an advanced, theoretical paper, your introduction might well also include a review of the existing scholarship on the subject, a section in which you identify how you collected your data and other information, and a discussion of the methodology you will use.

Wolfinger is a guide for such advanced papers. The main body is the largest part of the paper. It should have a logical organization. Especially if the paper is long, it is often a good idea to divide the main body into sections designated by headings and subheadings.

Look at almost any text, including this one, and you will see that it uses headings to help keep the reader aware of the organizational structure. Also with regard to your main body, do not assume knowledge on the part of the reader.

Include all important information, explain its significance, and detail your logic. Write your paper as though its reader will be a reasonably intelligent and informed person but not an expert on your topic. Your instructor wants to know what you know and will not "read into" the paper information that is not there. The conclusion should sum up what you have found and stress the evidence that supports your analysis. There is something very human about wanting to have things summed up, so do not leave your reader hanging without a conclusion.

There are several ways to approach your paper. A common organizational approach is a chronological one. The advantage of this approach is that it uses the passage of time as its organizing mechanism. The disadvantage of a chronological approach is that it can easily become a "laundry list" of events, both important and unimportant. Students often list everything they find, leaving it to the reader to determine which factors are most important. Chronologies are also no substitute for analysis.

There is nothing wrong with a chronological approach if it is done well; just be sure to put more emphasis throughout on why things happened than on what happened. A more analytic approach would be organized around a set of factors, or variables, that are important to the subject of the paper. Theoretical approaches can also be used to organize a paper. See Allison's Essence of Decision for an illustration of such an analytic approach. Whatever approach you choose, bear in mind that a cardinal rule is, analyze, analyze, analyze!

Summarizing your findings in the conclusion does not mean that this is the only place to put "you" in the paper. Your analysis should appear throughout the paper. A big error that many novice writers make is to use the main body of the paper to create a heap of facts and to wait until the conclusion to say what they mean. This approach is boring and will not impress your readers with your analytical ability. The best papers by far are those that draw data, events, and other material together and interpret them throughout.

Besides organization, the other hallmark of a good paper is clarity in writing. Remember that if a paper fails to communicate well, then its research-no matter how well done--will have little impact. There is an old piece of advice that says, "write like you speak. Good written communication is somewhat different from good spoken communication. When you speak to someone, especially face to face, you can convey meaning through voice inflection, gestures, and other methods in addition to your words.

These methods are not available in written communications. Therefore, choice of words, punctuation, and other considerations are particularly vital when you write. Good writing can be divided into three parts: Thomas Alva Edison once supposedly commented that "Genius is one percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.

Writing and polishing drafts of a paper take time and effort. They cannot be done the night before the paper is due. If you sit down at your word processor the night before your report is due and write it into the wee hours of the morning, you will almost certainly leave your reader as bleary-eyed when he or she reads the paper as you were when you wrote it.

Two things to do are to write drafts and to get others to read your paper. Write a draft, preferably more than one. No professional writer would dream of sending a manuscript out for review or to press without writing multiple drafts. Indeed, the more one writes, the more one feels the need to do drafts.

Only undergraduates have the hubris to keyboard a paper into the computer, print a copy out, hand it in, and wait confidently for that rave review and an "A" grade from the instructor.

A better idea is to write a first draft. Note here that the adjective "rough" does not precede "draft. Once your smooth draft is done, put it aside for a few days so that you can gain perspective. You may be surprised at how many ways you find to improve what you have written when you look at it with "fresh eyes. There are many people who can help you write a first-rate paper. One person is your instructor. Discuss your topic and your ideas with your professor. He or she may be able to help you refine your topic, avoid pitfalls, identify resources, or plan the paper's organization.

Submit drafts to your professor far enough ahead of the deadline to give the instructor time to suggest revisions. It may prove helpful also to ask a classmate, a family member, or someone else to read your paper.

Most people are not good judges of their own writing. We tend to read what we meant to say, not what we actually wrote. A fresh reader will be able to point out technical errors and lapses in your argument and organization. Writing centers are another source of help at many colleges and universities. You may have already paid for such assistance with your tuition dollars; you might as well use it. It may take innate talent to become a great literary figure, but achieving a reasonably pleasing literary style is possible for everyone who exercises a little care.

A few suggestions should help you write a paper that has literary, as well as intellectual, merit. Watch your sentence structure. Students and scholars too often seem to assume that long, complex sentences are symbolic of profundity. They are not; they are mostly just cumbersome. Simple, subject-verb-object sentences are best. Still, if you do not vary them occasionally, numerous short sentences do not "read" well. So, after several simple sentences, add a longer one.

But do not go too far the other way. Consider "Rourke's Rule of 2s": Rely on active tense, action verbs. Avoid the passive tense No: Similarly, action verbs made, jumped, went are better than verbs of being is, are, were. Colloquial English typically does not make a good impression unless you are writing fiction. Not sure your body's up to task? Try isolating the first sentence of each paragraph; together, they should read like a list of evidence that proves your thesis.

Try to relate the actual subject of the essay say, Plato's Symposium to a tangentially related issue you happen to know something about say, the growing trend of free-wheeling hookups in frat parties. Try using the ROCC method: R estate your thesis statement. O ne important detail which is usually found in your last paragraph. C onclude — wrap it up. C lincher — where you give the reader something left to think about. Each has a precise notation system, so if you're unsure of the rules, check the manual online versions are available at owl.

Peppering quotes throughout your text is certainly a good way to help make your point, but don't overdo it and take care not to use so many quotes as the embodiment of your points that you're basically allowing other authors to make the point and write the paper for you.

Avoid cutting and pasting from other people's arguments. By all means use eminent thinkers in the field's thoughts to back up your own thinking but avoid saying nothing other than "A says The reader wants to know what you say ultimately. It's helpful to sort out your bibliography from the beginning, to avoid having a last minute scramble: Burn flab, build muscle. Space is at a premium in any graded paper, so finding ways to cull words is always a sensible approach.

Are your sentences in good shape? Examine each one and decide whether you've used the fewest words possible while still retaining meaning. Trade in weak "to-be" verbs for stronger "action" verbs. Don't be a such a slob. Running your spelling-checker is only the first step in proofreading your paper! A spell-check won't catch errors like "how" instead of "show", nor will it pick up on doubled words "the the" or grammar problems unless you use MS Word, which can be configured to check grammar, and already catches double words.

Little goofs like these aren't likely to impress the instructor — if you're too careless to proofread, after all, there's a good chance you didn't put much effort into your paper. Decent grammar should be a given. You need a teacher to give you the benefit of the doubt, not correct your apostrophe use. A few too many errors and the message is soon lost beneath the irritation of the errors involved. Think of a good title to catch the reader's attention, but not a too long or too short one!

For some essayists , a great title appears at the beginning of writing while for others, it only becomes apparent after slogging through the paper in its entirety.

If you're still stuck, brainstorm with a friend or family member; you might be surprised how a fresh mind unacquainted with the topic can come up with a pithy title at a moment's notice! You would need an abstract, an introduction, body paragraphs and then a conclusion. Don't forget the references! Not Helpful 2 Helpful Before writing, make absolutely certain you have the specific topic you will cover, and know whether or not you have any flexibility if your written work ends up being on a topic of something close but not quite your original topic.

Try placing your ideas on a large piece of paper to make a visual. When using the visual to think about what you want to do with each idea, attempt to put them in order of how you will present them. Then outline, both in brief and in sentence form. This will let you know further if your ideas are in the correct place. Not Helpful 5 Helpful I'm writing a term paper, but I'm having trouble concentrating. What can I do? Take a few deep breathes; eat alertness boosting foods like almonds or fruit; and, if motivation is a problem, read a few articles on the topic to get inspired!

Not Helpful 4 Helpful You cite your sources at the end of your report on a separate page. How you format your citations will depend on what style you are using: For more information, read: How to Write a Works Cited Page. Your professor should have a minimum and maximum word count or page count minus cover page and bibliography in the rubric or assignment description. Not Helpful 10 Helpful Unless you were specifically instructed to add pictures, then no, you should not include pictures in your term paper.

Ordinarily, you would write the introduction and the whole paper first, and the last thing to do is write an abstract. Make an outline before you even start writing, featuring your main points, and then sub-points related to those main points. Then plan out your paragraphs, figuring out which points you want to make first, second, and so on.

When you're finished writing, make sure you go back through and revise. You can even have someone else read through your paper and tell you if they think you should move or change anything.


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A good term paper topic is the most vital part of a term paper and our term paper writers at laheimdo.cf brainstorm and research a great deal before selecting a topic as, this is believed to be the basic foundation of a term paper.

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Introduction For many students, writing the introduction is the first part of the process, setting down the direction of the paper and laying out exactly what the research paper is trying to achieve.. For others, the introduction is the last thing written, acting as a quick summary of the paper. As long as you have planned a good structure for the parts of a research paper, both approaches are.

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Term papers are one of the most common assignments that students receive. In order to get the best grade, you must include all of the major parts of a term paper, no matter how short the paper may be. Dec 22,  · Remember that term paper writing is an important part of your academic career. Be sure to include title page, table of contents, body of the paper and reference page. Never hand in a paper written for one subject to another subject%(11).

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It is the most concerning among all parts of term paper, because it is the first impression of your term paper on your reader so, it should be the best and flawless. An introduction identifies and declares your term paper topic and explains its importance. So, it should be adequately informative. Parts of Term Paper - Term Paper. Parts A term paper is a task that helps a student to improve his research, writing and analytical abilities. This improves your written communication skills which will facilitate you in your.